On this day in Caribbean history, January 11, 1999, Haiti’s President Rene Prevail dissolves Parliament after a 22-month impasse with no working Government. He appoints a premier and a Cabinet by decree.

The son of agronomist Claude Préval, René showed an interest in his father’s career, and in 1963 he left Haiti for Belgium to study agronomy. He earned a degree in that subject from Gembloux Agricultural University, and he continued his education at the University of Pisa, with work in geothermal sciences. In 1970 Préval moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., where he worked as a messenger and a waiter. He returned to Haiti five years later and took a position at the National Institute for Mineral Resources. In 1988 he opened a bakery in Port-au-Prince that provided bread to poor children. While there he became acquainted with Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a charismatic Roman Catholic priest working in the slums. When Aristide was elected president in 1990, Préval became prime minister. He and Aristide went into exile after a military coup in 1991, but they returned in 1994 after the regime had stepped aside under threat of U.S. invasion. In 1995 Préval was easily elected to succeed Aristide.

Préval’s ability to govern was hindered by Aristide’s dominant presence. When Aristide formed a new political party in 1997, Préval refused to join. With political infighting paralyzing the country, he could manage only modest achievements during his first term. His rural and neighbourhood projects benefiting the poor earned him the endearment Ti (“Little”) René. A quiet and unpretentious man, he also earned a reputation as an honest leader.

In 2001 Préval handed over power and became Haiti’s first elected president to leave office after a full term. He retreated from public life to the family farm in the village of Marmelade. There he remained above the fray as he witnessed Haiti’s descent into the political chaos and violence that saw the forced exile in February 2004 of his successor, Aristide, and that continued unabated under an appointed government. In mid-2005, however, after several hundred peasant leaders visited Marmelade and insisted that Préval run in the upcoming election, he reluctantly returned to public life. He and his allies formed Lespwa (“Hope”), a political coalition, and Préval emerged as the front-runner. He was widely viewed as the only candidate who could genuinely represent Haiti’s poor and mediate an end to the country’s violence. On May 14, 2006, Préval was sworn in to serve a five-year term.

 

 

 

Encyclopedia Britannica

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here